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Boston Legal

Rene Auberjonois

Paul Lewiston

Rene Murat Auberjonois was born into European royalty, albeit in New York City on June 1, 1940 (his family had fled to the States during World War II); his grandfather was a Swiss Impressionist painter, his father a famous Pulitzer Prize-nominated journalist, and his mother a princess and heir of one Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. He showed his singing and acting chops at a young age in Paris, and later honed them at an upstate New York artist colony and in summer theater. His classmates included Burgess Meredith and John Houseman, the latter of whom gave him his first theater job and taught him at Juillard School. Auberjonois' impeccable credentials extended to his first proper role in a Broadway musical: he costarred (and won a Tony) with Katharine Hepburn in 1969's Coco. He became successful in the TV medium in 1980 with a role as gubernatorial speechwriter Clayton Endicott III on Benson. Auberjonois also seemed drawn to the legal realm, appearing as a judge in two series, Judging Amy and The Practice. He spent six seasons as Constable Odo on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. When that series ended, he took the role of Paul Lewiston on Boston Legal as part of a cast that went on to win several ensemble awards. He has done extensive voiceover work and is very active in charity fundraising, as well as teaching acting classes.

Character Bio

Managing partner Paul Lewiston has many of Crane, Pool and Schmidt's thankless day-to-day tasks, including operations such as accounting and damage control (we're looking at you, Denny Crane). He is rarely shown in the courtroom, though he is the firm's legal advisor. After losing his wife to cancer, Lewiston struggles with family matters: His sole child, Rachel, struggles with drug addiction, and he is often forced to care for her daughter, his grandchild Fiona. Add to this the daily pressures of being the partner who plays the game by its rules, and it's apparent why Lewiston often yearns to be free of troublemakers like Denny Crane and Alan Shore. He even inserts himself in his coworkers' relationships, particularly those of lawyer Denise Bauer, whom he urges to stop dating a terminally ill cancer patient because of his own personal demons.